ANGKOR WAT, SIEM REAP, CAMBODIA

When you say something’s like: “It’s the best thing I had seen in my life”, or “It can’t exist something more wonderful”. Sounds like a cliché, but in this case, isn’t. For sure is one of the seven wonders of the world, and everyone would see this place at least once in their life. So, that mean its usually full of people, the good thing is that Angkor Wat is very huge and dispersive so just in the most famous Wat you are crowded. I went there in the high season so there was a lot of people, If you will visit Angkor Wat in the summertime will be less touristic but the weather will be worst, usually will rain.

Was like a mystical experience and feeling lost in this immense park was awesome. I drove a motorbike and I went from one Wat to another in a very easy way.

Highlights:

Angkor Wat is the biggest temple of the whole world, that’s why it’s easy to feel lost inside. I appreciate more the temple viewed by outside. It’s the most famous wat and it’s full of people at anytime, also at 5AM!

Special feature: “Western orientation: symbolically, west is the direction of death, which once led a large number of scholars to conclude that Angkor Wat must have existed primarily as a tomb. This idea was supported by the fact that the magnificent bas-reliefs of the temple were designed to be viewed in an anticlockwise direction, a practice that has precedents in ancient Hindu funerary rites. Vishnu, however, is also frequently associated with the west, and it is now commonly accepted that Angkor Wat most likely served both as a temple and as a mausoleum for Suryavarman II“. (Lonely Planet)

Bayon temple is one of the most famous Wat in Angkor Wat. It’s very impressive that there are faces sculpted everywhere. The Wat is very huge and unique for his architecture. For sure is one of the must seeing in Angkor Wat. “Some say that the Khmer empire was divided into 54 provinces at the time of Bayon’s construction, hence the 54 pairs of all-seeing eyes keeping watch on the kingdom’s outlying subjects“. (Lonely Planet)

In Ta Prohm Wat the jungle take over. It’s not very big but it’s wonderful to see how trees are intertwined with the temple. “One of the most famous spots in Ta Prohm is the so-called ‘Tomb Raider tree’, where Angelina Jolie’s Lara Croft picked a jasmine flower before falling through the earth into…Pinewood Studios“. (Lonely Planet)

I felt very impressed when I saw those three temples, but there are more Wat that are also beautiful.

Noted the magnificence of Angkor Wat, there was somethings that made me thinking about it: the government gain millions of dollars thanks to the tourists that visiting Angkor Wat. But I was thinking about the using of these many money. What they do? The sanity and hospitals are terrible, every roads are damage and full of holes, there is rubbish everywhere, except in Angkor Wat, obviously that place is very clean. The one-day ticket cost 37$, the three-day ticket cost 62$ and the seven-day ticket 72$. Thousands of people are visiting Angkor Wat every single day. Someone can explain how this money are used for? It was announced in August 2016 that 2$ from every entrance ticket sold will go to the Kantha Bopha Children Hospitals Foundation, which offers free medical treatment to children in five hospitals around Cambodia. “Cambodia’s Ministry of Tourism released its annual report last week, which revealed that international tourist numbers passed the five million mark in 2016. Despite this, revenue from tourism had dropped from the 2015 figures, a problem the government hopes to tackle by eliminating non-licensed tourist businesses by 2018″.

Angkor Wat is a big business but Cambodia is still one of the poorest country in the world. It’s not good that people doesn’t benefited by Angkor Wat visitors, at least to build better schools and hospitals. I think just the Government benefits, like always. But this is just my humble opinion.

G. F.

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